Be in a Band Part 2

This is our second instalment of “Being in a Band”

The best advice about getting yourself into a band comes directly from those who have lived it. Thankfully, our TMB teachers ALL have experience with this. We have musicians, first and foremost, who have a passion for teaching others.

We’ve asked our Rockin’ TMB Teachers to shed a little light onto those who are wondering what it would be like to use their instrument in a band.

Singing teacher, Jessica Friend, has offered us information about her singing group and the great things it has to offer her life:

 

"Singing in my vintage trio, The D Day Dolls, has developed my vocal technique, acting, knowledge of repertoire, social media and promotional skills, in addition I have built up a network of contacts meaning I can gig more often and for a great variety of venues! It's great to sing in a band/group as there's always something new going on and you never know what exciting new venture is around the corner"

 - Jessica Friend 

Alex Morse, one of our Stratford Drum Teachers offers us his point of view as well:

Playing live with other musicians is the most rewarding part of learning an instrument. I firmly believe you improve/ learn a lot about your playing as soon as you start interacting with other people.

I understand a lot students get nervous, or don't know if they're good enough to perform yet etc, but I'd always suggest doing it as quickly as you can! Just to get that first performance out the way & once it's over you'll realise how fun it is.

My first band performance was in a school assembled (Rock N Roll I know!) but I'm glad I experienced that early into my drumming and shared that experience with my mates.

For any student on any instrument I'd really recommend getting together with some friends and learn even just one song together and perform it at school or a local open mic, you'll be scared at first but I promise you'll enjoy it!!

Once I started playing live I began to enjoy styles of music I never excepted to like. I first learnt drums excepting to just play rock music but currently I play in a jazz trio, an indie band and occasionally play for an electronic band.

So yeah book yourself and some mates into an open mic, learn one song and it'll all kick start from there!"

Alex Morse :) 

 

Jack Blackman is a multi-instrument teacher with us, teaching both drums and strings (guitar, bass and ukulele) He is a multi-faceted musician who has some great insight to playing in a group:

Playing in a professional band is 75% hanging around backstage, travelling to and from gigs, and waiting for the show to start. However, for all that, in the 25% spent on stage I have had some of the most enjoyable moments in my life.

At the moment I play the vast majority of my gigs solo. This has its advantages and disadvantages over playing in a group. When you are playing solo, you can present a song in its own unique way each night, and see how far your creativity and spontaneity can take it….without falling off the cliff of course….You can vary a setlist depending on your mood and the mood of the audience, play songs that you just penned that morning, or go way back to a song that you haven’t touched in years….you always get more constraints playing with other people. Those moments when you can hear a pin drop are far more powerful when playing solo to an audience.

Despite this, whether playing in a tiny pub, a huge outdoor festival, a wedding, or a sweaty stick-to-the-floor rock ‘n’ roll venue, there is nothing quite like playing in a band. A good band is like a gang. You’ll see the world together, usually from the windowless backseat of a transit van in the dark.

-Jack B.    

 

Next, we’ve got our Stratford based Piano teacher, Toby. He offers some great insight to the creative process and what it is like to work for your dreams.

 

“Before joining a band, especially as a keyboard player, it can be quite solitary practicing as a soloist. I gained a huge amount when forming The Unravelling after initially finding it difficult to blend my style (we were forming an 'originals' band) with other accomplished musicians but as we were all committed - ending up practicing in some pretty smelly rehearsal studios sometimes just to get together, we kept it going and hopefully created something fresh and unique.

Being part of such a creative process is thrilling and finally realising our first album in the studio galvanised our first two years of experimentation. My advice for any new budding bands out there would be to allow time for ideas to take shape and allow each other the space to bring their part to the overall sound as this is sometimes easier said than done!”

Thanks,
Tobias 

Lastly, our Bicester Vocal Teacher, Emma Doupé shares her experiences with us as a solo singer vs. singing with an ensemble.

 

 

“I moved to the U.K. nearly two years ago so that I could make something of myself, musically. I have a degree in Classical Performance, which has helped turn me into a more versatile singer, but left me wanting more. I was looking for a more modern way to get out there and sing!

I noticed that here in England, there is a huge market for cover bands and artists, so I started working on making covers that I enjoyed. After about a year of that, I wanted to do more than just sing the music of other artists. I wanted to reach more people.

Thankfully, I found a trio of guys who were looking for a new singer, who have been fast moving in creating original rock tunes.

Since joining the group, my musicianship has increased tenfold! I am a part of actively writing new music, coming up with vocal lines that enhance the written melodies. I have become more creative with word choice, which also helps my everyday vocabulary!

The best part of working in this new band, The Demoiselles, is that my music has a real meaning now. The music that we share comes from US, and our experiences, rather than us trying to translate the experiences of others. I now feel that I am expressing myself, musically, in a more natural way, that seems truer to my musical self. This is something I do not think I could have achieved by myself, without the musicianship skills of my other band mates.”

PLEASE look back in a few days for more information about The Demoiselles and their NEWLY RELEASED EP! We will be posting another short blog about this fun little experience for Emma’s band!

 

Next Thursday, check the blog again for Part 3 of “Being in a Band” with more testimonials from our teachers and information from big time bands on their experiences! 

 

Love 

Emma x


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Be in a Band Part 2

This is our second instalment of “Being in a Band”

The best advice about getting yourself into a band comes directly from those who have lived it. Thankfully, our TMB teachers ALL have experience with this. We have musicians, first and foremost, who have a passion for teaching others.

We’ve asked our Rockin’ TMB Teachers to shed a little light onto those who are wondering what it would be like to use their instrument in a band.

Singing teacher, Jessica Friend, has offered us information about her singing group and the great things it has to offer her life:

 

"Singing in my vintage trio, The D Day Dolls, has developed my vocal technique, acting, knowledge of repertoire, social media and promotional skills, in addition I have built up a network of contacts meaning I can gig more often and for a great variety of venues! It's great to sing in a band/group as there's always something new going on and you never know what exciting new venture is around the corner"

 - Jessica Friend 

Alex Morse, one of our Stratford Drum Teachers offers us his point of view as well:

Playing live with other musicians is the most rewarding part of learning an instrument. I firmly believe you improve/ learn a lot about your playing as soon as you start interacting with other people.

I understand a lot students get nervous, or don't know if they're good enough to perform yet etc, but I'd always suggest doing it as quickly as you can! Just to get that first performance out the way & once it's over you'll realise how fun it is.

My first band performance was in a school assembled (Rock N Roll I know!) but I'm glad I experienced that early into my drumming and shared that experience with my mates.

For any student on any instrument I'd really recommend getting together with some friends and learn even just one song together and perform it at school or a local open mic, you'll be scared at first but I promise you'll enjoy it!!

Once I started playing live I began to enjoy styles of music I never excepted to like. I first learnt drums excepting to just play rock music but currently I play in a jazz trio, an indie band and occasionally play for an electronic band.

So yeah book yourself and some mates into an open mic, learn one song and it'll all kick start from there!"

Alex Morse :) 

 

Jack Blackman is a multi-instrument teacher with us, teaching both drums and strings (guitar, bass and ukulele) He is a multi-faceted musician who has some great insight to playing in a group:

Playing in a professional band is 75% hanging around backstage, travelling to and from gigs, and waiting for the show to start. However, for all that, in the 25% spent on stage I have had some of the most enjoyable moments in my life.

At the moment I play the vast majority of my gigs solo. This has its advantages and disadvantages over playing in a group. When you are playing solo, you can present a song in its own unique way each night, and see how far your creativity and spontaneity can take it….without falling off the cliff of course….You can vary a setlist depending on your mood and the mood of the audience, play songs that you just penned that morning, or go way back to a song that you haven’t touched in years….you always get more constraints playing with other people. Those moments when you can hear a pin drop are far more powerful when playing solo to an audience.

Despite this, whether playing in a tiny pub, a huge outdoor festival, a wedding, or a sweaty stick-to-the-floor rock ‘n’ roll venue, there is nothing quite like playing in a band. A good band is like a gang. You’ll see the world together, usually from the windowless backseat of a transit van in the dark.

-Jack B.    

 

Next, we’ve got our Stratford based Piano teacher, Toby. He offers some great insight to the creative process and what it is like to work for your dreams.

 

“Before joining a band, especially as a keyboard player, it can be quite solitary practicing as a soloist. I gained a huge amount when forming The Unravelling after initially finding it difficult to blend my style (we were forming an 'originals' band) with other accomplished musicians but as we were all committed - ending up practicing in some pretty smelly rehearsal studios sometimes just to get together, we kept it going and hopefully created something fresh and unique.

Being part of such a creative process is thrilling and finally realising our first album in the studio galvanised our first two years of experimentation. My advice for any new budding bands out there would be to allow time for ideas to take shape and allow each other the space to bring their part to the overall sound as this is sometimes easier said than done!”

Thanks,
Tobias 

Lastly, our Bicester Vocal Teacher, Emma Doupé shares her experiences with us as a solo singer vs. singing with an ensemble.

 

 

“I moved to the U.K. nearly two years ago so that I could make something of myself, musically. I have a degree in Classical Performance, which has helped turn me into a more versatile singer, but left me wanting more. I was looking for a more modern way to get out there and sing!

I noticed that here in England, there is a huge market for cover bands and artists, so I started working on making covers that I enjoyed. After about a year of that, I wanted to do more than just sing the music of other artists. I wanted to reach more people.

Thankfully, I found a trio of guys who were looking for a new singer, who have been fast moving in creating original rock tunes.

Since joining the group, my musicianship has increased tenfold! I am a part of actively writing new music, coming up with vocal lines that enhance the written melodies. I have become more creative with word choice, which also helps my everyday vocabulary!

The best part of working in this new band, The Demoiselles, is that my music has a real meaning now. The music that we share comes from US, and our experiences, rather than us trying to translate the experiences of others. I now feel that I am expressing myself, musically, in a more natural way, that seems truer to my musical self. This is something I do not think I could have achieved by myself, without the musicianship skills of my other band mates.”

PLEASE look back in a few days for more information about The Demoiselles and their NEWLY RELEASED EP! We will be posting another short blog about this fun little experience for Emma’s band!

 

Next Thursday, check the blog again for Part 3 of “Being in a Band” with more testimonials from our teachers and information from big time bands on their experiences! 

 

Love 

Emma x


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